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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  April 2, 2015 9:00am-10:01am EDT

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hello. i'm david eades with bbc world news. our top stories. the infamous militant group al shabaab says it carried out the attack on a university campus in kenya, killing at least 14 and wounding dozens more. a trawler sinks off russia's coast with a loss of more than 50 lives. saudi arabia tells the bbc its forces will do whatever is necessary to tackle the houthi militia in yemen. >> so it is not a sectarian problem, it is an objective to make sure that that region the
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border safe and stable. and the colorful new look ferry across the mersey. we'll explain why liverpool's iconic system has been given a pop art makeover. hello. thanks for joining us. a group of masked the gunmen have stormed a university compound in garissa. this is a town in the northeastern province of kenya. the gunmen attacked the university at around 5:30 local time. you see where it is in relation to nairobi there. the security forces are finding it difficult to get into the area itself because the militants are shooting at them from the roof within the compound. this is what we do know so far. at least 14 people are dead. two of them guards shot at the
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university gates. another 50 or so are wounded. there have been reports, as well, that many staff and students are still trapped inside the compound. well, the militant group, al shabaab, has said in the last hour, that it's responsible for these attacks. the kenyan interior ministry has been tweeting say that of the four hostiles three have been evacuated. the attackers are cornered and the operations are going on. well kenya's national disaster operations has also been putting out messages about the majority of those being wounded, have gunshot wounds and another tweeter says four are in critical condition and have been airlifted to nairobi. we can hear also now from an eyewitness to the attack. augustan is a student at the university. he lives on campus. he was there this morning as that attack got underway. he managed to get away he's hiding at a friend's house now and spoke to us from there. we voiced up his answers,
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because it's a pretty poor quality telephone line. >> translator: we were asleep. it was around 5:30 this morning. we heard several gunshots outside the school which forced many of us to escape except a few that were taken hostage by the gunman. it was horrible, i ran around. my life was in danger. in fact everybody, our lives were the danger because they were shooting at us with live bullets, everywhere all over the school compound was gunfire. for the sake of god, i'm glad we were alive. some of us. there were people inside most of them escaped, their phones offline now. i'm trying to call but i can't reach them. they started by shooting two security guards. they were shooting randomly. they were not selecting anyone's identity. they were not selecting in terms of gender. they were just shooting randomly. i'm just giving thanks to god, because right now i'm safe in my friend's house. i'm now feeling safe. i'm feeling like i'm not going to return back to the university
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again. i don't even want to. i don't want to even go back there again. the security there is not good. we have been complaining to them. the security apparatus inside the school is pathetic. we've been complaining. just imagine, we're guarded by two policemen. yet in this area the security situation is well known to be not good. the whole campus is guarded by just two security men, two police officers. >> some pretty harsh words for what is a harrowing situation, isn't it? the bbc's ann soy is across it all in nairobi for us. ann, it's still going on is it? >> well we understand there's been a lull in the gunfire through the morning, but we've heard in the past hour that al shabaab has claimed responsibility. they called the bbc to say they
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staged this attack one, because the university is they consider it a non-muslim institution on muslim ground so they say when they went inside they separated muslims from non-mushfnon-muslims before. we have seen this strategy applied before by the group, farther north where they have attacked a quarry and also a bus and celebrated muslims from non-with us limes and killed the non-muslim non-muslims. so they have claimed responsibility for and they say that people will be shocked when they eventually see what happened inside that university. >> well, it seems to be getting more shocking as the details gradually emerge doesn't it? certainly the number of people involved. >> that's right. the official word we have now from the government were two fatalities but we've also had, through the ap agency a mortuary attendant saying he has received 15 bodies. so it appears the death toll is climbing here. the other thing, though at
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least 29 people injured. there have been ambulances moving out of the institution and into the hospitals in town. the red cross has dispatched several doctors to help deal with complicated cases of injuries in garissa. >> okay. anne, we'll leave it there for now. thank you very much, indeed. as these developments continue, we'll bring the latest to you here on bbc world news. now, a major rescue operation is also taking place in the western pacific ocean, after a large fishing trawler sank. at least 54 people have died. the russian trawler went down in the sea of okhotsk. >> we understand the trawler sunk in just 15 minutes and that the captain didn't manage even to put out a distress signal. as you said at the moment the focus is very much on the search
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and rescue operation that's underway. more than 50 people we know have been killed. 63 people so far, have been rescued from the water and from lifeboats, that they managed to scramble to. but there are still 15 people missing. and the main focus is obviously on trying to find them. and the people that are doing that are other fishermen who are on boats nearby. we understand that 26 fishing boats are now involved in the search and rescue operation, as well as the emergency ministry helicopters, two of them. and the y,idea, of course is to try to bring the injured back to dry land as soon as possible. but we know it takes 12 hours by boat to get back to dry land and a couple of hours, at least, by helicopter. so the most seriously injured, we understand some people are unconscious. the others also suffering from severe hypothermia. the most seriously injured will be brought back by helicopter. >> so sarah, briefly, what on earth happened. >> well, two theories.
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the main theory that was put out by the investigative community at the beginning was that there was some kind of collision, possibly with some floating ice. but we're also hearing from local officials, emergency management officials that perhaps the trawler capsized because it was simply overloaded. but there is a theory that the fishermen were bringing in a major capture, some 80 tons worth of fish and the trawler simply capsized because it couldn't cope with that. but this is an ongoing investigation. >> that's the latest there from moscow. now, we're going to pick up on the world of aaron. >> didn't know which way you were going to go there, did you? >> teasing you. teasing myself actually. >> well take a breather. i'll take over. we'll start with this. the talks between six world powers and iran over its nuclear program, they've continued once again throughout the evening. iran has been subjected to a range of sanctions in recent years, all in an effort to curb the country's nuclear ambitions. and needless to say, those
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sanctions have had a massive economic impact on the country. take a look at this. it is estimated that iran's oil exports have slumped some 59% 2011, because of embargoes and sanctions. the cost to iran i'll tell you what, that is around $60 billion of lost trade each and every year. and an economy at least 20% smaller than it would have been. all of this according to u.s. estimates. so, a huge opportunity for the business world, if sanctions are lifted. we'll have a lot more coming up on "gmt" in just over an hour's time. also looking at this for the united states where fast food giant mcdonald's has become the latest major employer to bow to pressure over low pay. yes, because mcdonald's says as of july it's raising wages at its company-owned restaurants to $1 over the local minimum wage and offering paid leave. the average starting wage for mcdonald's staff is around $9 an
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hour. the company says that will raise to $9.90 come july the 1st and over $10 by next year. however, it is way off the $15 being demanded by wage protesters. that's the fight for $15 campaign, as they've been called, which has staged strikes and protests at fast food outlets across the country. and i should say this new rise by mcdonald's doesn't affect the employees of franchised restaurants, who are the vast majority in the u.s. i think something like 90% of mcdonald's in the u.s. are franchises. so more on that on "gmt." and lastly this one. yes, it was the car that elvis loved. in fact, it's the car that many people loved. and ford is relaunching its famous lincoln continental car, after retiring the name or the brand, back in 2002. it is all part of the u.s. automaker's effort to target the luxury market in the united states and cyanhina, but can it compete with its german rivals?
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we'll hear from the boss coming up in "gmt." follow me on the twitter. you can get me @bbcaaron. i could see you in one of those. >> it's a brute, isn't it? >> it is a brute. >> of course. >> aaron, thanks very much. do stay with us here on bbc world news. still to come on the program, we'll be explaining how wartime camouflage mixed with pop art gives you liverpool's famous ferry across the mersey a whole new look. so we go cheap. you know, because we're never gonna need it. until one day, we do. now that cut-rate policy is costing us big. makes you wonder if there's something better out there . see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. ♪ ♪ ♪
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now, the flow of people heading to the middle east to fight with islamist militants has reached its highest rate yet, according to the united nations. a report from them says that 25,000 people have now traveled to join groups like al qaeda and islamic state. the u.n. says numbers have risen sharply in the last ten months. some 22,000 of those people is have gone to syria and iraq alone. well syrian military helicopters are reported to have attacked rebel forces closer to the border with jordan. earlier, they are said to have captured the main route between syria and jordan and an alliance of rebel groups calling themselves the southern front says that it took control of the area and that it had told forces from the al qaeda-linked al nusra front to leave the area. reports from yemen say that
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houthi rebels may have withdrawn from several parts of aden following saudi-led air strikes. the city is the main foothold of loyalists of president abdomen-rabba mansour hadi. we've been talking to general asiri of the saudi-led coalition and asking him about the future of the campaign. >> how much longer can the air campaign go on if you can't force the houthis to withdraw? >> so we have a very hard task to targeting them among the cities. this is why we have so far, we cannot say so long, but it is a hard task. so there is no time limit? >> we have time frame, but as you know there is an element a
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six-year plan. >> what steps are you taking to avoid civilian casualties. how sure can you be that the targets you're hitting do not hit civilians? >> we're using all our sources to make sure we do not hit the wrong target. we make sure it is not the houthi target or the ali abdullah troops. >> how likely is it that this is going to extend to a grand campaign. >> it is not a must that we have a ground operation. if i can achieve my goal with air strike with special forces action, with employment. we are going now step by step. if we discover one day that we
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need to go in the ground we are ready to do it. >> i see you have a special forces sign on your uniform. special forces got the president out of yemen, they smuggled him out. have they been active elsewhere yemen, on the ground? >> actually -- >> yes? >> we are working in the total spectrum of the operation. ops, maritime, air, ground to make sure that we have a very successful campaign. now we cannot talk about this and you know frank, that it is -- it could be risky for the operation, but we do all that is necessary to make this campaign successful. >> what would you say to these people who say, this is a sectarian war? >> they are doing this because of the programs because of their agenda. they want to implement in yemen, and one day, they did what they
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did in 2009 where they attack our borders. so it is not a sectarian problem. it is an objective to make sure that the region the border safe and stable. though one needs a very agitated area. we are calling for peace. even in yemen and everywhere. >> well that's brigadier general ahmed asiri, with the saudi perspective on what to do next. i'm joined now by mohammad yayier of bbc arabic service. as we hear from the spokesman there and talk about boots on the ground, whether it's special forces or not, there are a few words, aren't there, coming out suggesting that there is a military presence a number of troops seem to have disembarked at aden. what do you know about that? >> well the rurts news agency is quoting eyewitnesss in aden
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that dozens of what appear to be special forces have disembarked in the aden port. nationality of them is unknown. and this would be an important development. because aden is such an important part of this operation. it's the last bastion of the president hadi's power in the country. if the houthis managed to take control of aden it would be a huge blow to the saudi-led coalition and to the president, because what the saudis want to do is to maintain the power of the president, and force the houthis to resume the u.n.-led negotiations to form a government where the houthis, who are thought to be backed by iran, the archrival of saudi arabia, would not hold the keys to the power in the country. >> i suppose there is that distinction between special forces who may go in for distinct operations, and ground forces in a more general sense.
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but ahmed asiri is saying that isn't a must. i don't feel that that must happen. the longer this goes on inevitably, though i suppose the likelihood of that happening rises. >> it will all depend on what happens on the ground. because preferably, for the saudi-led coalition, they don't want boots on the ground. what they want to do is using their air power to force the houthis to retreat and breaking this alliance between the houthis and the former president, abdullah saleh who controls a large part of the army. if they manage to do this they will not need to put boots on the ground. but if the advance of the houthis continue they need to start with special forces to do specific missions and eventually, what the saudi spokesman said possibility of some sort of ground invasion. although this would be a very risky step because the risk of
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being caught in a quagmire. >> mohammed thanks very much. let's get the latest now in our series that looks at the success or otherwise of the truce in eastern ukraine, the deal that was signed in minsk in february. our correspondent, natalia ant antlava has been spending time with rebel fighters near one of the worst sites of the conflict. this is their story. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: these guys are taking us to the position in the middle of the road. they stoppeded the the car stormed
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out, and are checking the papers. telling them they can't go that way. [ speaking foreign language ] there's a checkpoint down below. he says that's why, because there are checkpoints around here. he says don't go any further, because we may get caught up. he says there are ukrainian snipers on the other side. it's very close, about a kilometer away from the ukrainian position. [ speaking foreign language ]
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these guys believe there are american tanks a kilometer away from here on the other side. they are convinced they are american tanks. there are no american tanks on the other side. that's the ukrainian tank. definitely not american. i just said oh, you think that americans supply weapons to the other side but you're armed by the americans. he says it's my trophy. >> some trophy. natalia there. now, during the first world war, around 2,000 warships were painted in bright colors to confuse german u-boat commanders.
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it's a technique that's been brought back to life now, not for far ships, but for a mersey ferry. >> reporter: sir peter blak back on mersey's side not because of the beatles, but the boat. his latest work is rather bigger than a 12-inch square. as part of liverpool's first world war commemorations, he was ask to give the ferry across the mersey a makeover and it took 3,200 hours of painting to finish the job. >> i mean it's very rare to have this much this big a canvasscan canvas to work on. there are walls of orange and kbroel yellows and blues and it was just putting nice good bright colors together on a large scale. >> reporter: the ferry is a tribute to what was known during the first world war as dazzle ships. the british artist norman wilkinson, was serving as a
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royal navy volunteer and realized that ships could not be camouflaged, but could be painted in a way to make things difficult for the enemy. >> i think the principle of it is to not hide the ship but confuse the enemy. and if you're firing at the ship in the distance you shoot ahead of it and so it sails into the shell, as it were. whereas with dazzle you didn't quite know where it was. you couldn't place it in space, and you couldn't work out which was the front and which was the back. it's estimated that the ferry will cross the mersey 2,800 times while sporting its new look. colin patterson, bbc news liverpool. just time for me to bring you up to date on the situation in the northeastern province in kenya. garissa, the university college campus there, al shabaab, the islamist militants have said they're responsible for the attack, which has left at least
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14 people dead and up to another 50 wounded. that is the latest in terms of the figures we're hearing from eastern kenya and we understand that is still going on. you're watching bbc world news. you want an advanced degree, but sometimes work can get in the way. now capella university offers flexpath, a revolutionary new program that allows you to earn a degree at your pace and graduate at the speed of you. flexpath from capella university. hey nice game today. thanks. juicy fruit? sure i'll try a piec.... juicy fruit. so sweet you can't help but chew. ♪ music plays love you by the free design ♪ ♪
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hello. i'm david eades with bbc world news. our top stories. gunmen attack a university campus in kenya. local media say 15 people are dead dozens more wounded. 25,000. the u.n.'s estimate for people heading to join islamist militants in syria and iraq. we'll ask what's being done to try to stop them. the winner of nigeria's presidential election mohammad bu buhari tells us his priorities as he prepares to take office.
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>> the economy, literally, by corruption and corruption itself. also turning disaster into music. the man who uses wood from trees blown down by hurricanes to create handmade guitars. hello and thanks for joining us. a group of masked gunmen have stormed a university compound in garissa. that's a town in the northeastern province of kenya. the gunmen attacked the university at around 5:30 in the morning, local time. you can see where it is in relation to nairobi there. the security forces are finding it very difficult to get into the area because the militants are shooting at them from the roof. this is what we do know of what's going on. local media and the kenyan red
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cross are now saying at least 15 people are dead. at least 65 are wounded. there are reports, also that many staff and students are still trapped inside the compound. the militant group, al shabaab, has said in the course of the last hour or so that it is responsible for these attacks. our correspondent in nairobi, anne soy has just been tweeting. she said, al shabaab tells the bbc that they're inside the compound, they've separated muslims from non-muslims and released the muslims. the kenya interior ministry has also said that it's captured one of the attackers and the kenyan disasters operations say they're treating 65 people pb we can hear now from an eyewitness to the attack speaking just outside the university in garissa. >> as you can see the situation, we are in here we are -- we are trying to know what is happening. >> we heard some gunshot and we were sleeping so it was around
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5:00 and guys started jumping up and down running for their lives. but it was unfortunate where they were going to is where the gunshots were coming from. so this meant the guys to hide out in the field. so we went there. we went to the field and the gunshots continue and this made us to run to get away out from the school. >> that's just one of the accounts of what happened. we can also hear from another eyewitness, agustan, a student at the university and lives on campus. he was there in the morning when that attack began. well he got away. he's hiding at a friend's house now and spoke to us from there a short while ago. the line is not great, so we've voiced up his answers. >> translator: we were asleep it was around 5:30 a.m. this morning. we heard several gunshots outside the school which forced
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many of us to escape except a few who were taken hostage by the gunmen. it was horrible. i ran around my life was in danger. in fact, everybody, our lives were if damage because they were shooting at us with live bullets, everywhere all over the school compound was gunfire. for the sake of god, i'm glad we were alive. some of us. there were people inside. most of them escaped. their phones offline now. i'm trying to call but i can't reach them. they started by shooting two security guards. they were shooting randomly. they were not selecting anyone's identity. they were not selecting in terms of gender. they were just shooting randomly. i'm just giving thanks to god, because right now i'm safe in my friend's house. i'm now feeling safe. i'm feeling like i'm not going to return back to the university again. i don't even want to. i don't want to even go back there again. the security there is not good. we have been complaining to
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them. the security apparatus inside the school is pathetic. we've been complaining. just imagine, we're guarded by two policemen, yet in this area the security situation is well known to be not good. the whole campus is guarded by just security men, two police officers. >> you can get a sense there of a very angry student, given the level of security. and just to recap on what we do know so far, at least 15 people have been killed as many as 65. that could grow as well as a group of gunmen, they are al shabaab militants, we're now told by al shabaab themselves moved into the garissa university college campus. they killed two guards on the gate and then went on what just simply looks like a shooting can killing spree. we're also told that they have separated muslims from
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non-muslims and let the muslims go. and while the interior minhistry says that one of those gunmen has been picked up there is still a situation going on in the campus itself. some dramatic pictures to go with that of course. it's not news to have attacks by al shabaab in this area, but this clearly has caught the security services completely short. now, the flow of people heading to the middle east to fight with islamicist istlamist militants has reached its highest rate ever according to a report by the u.n.. it says 25,000 people have now traveled to join groups like al qaeda and islamic state. numbers have risen sharply in the last ten months in particular. some 22,000 of those heading that way have gone to syria and iraq alone. our world affairs correspondent mike wooldridge has been taking a look at these new statistics.
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the figure 25,000 is a pretty impressive number isn't it? seems to come from pretty much anywhere and everywhere. >> that's right, 100-odd countries. and the comparison is staggering here. this is good for the exports who have reported to the u.n. security council, pointing out that it was a few thousand fighters from a handful of countries just a decade ago, and that increase has been 71% since the middle of last year and now of foreign fighters traveling. yes, particularly for the middle east, for syria and iraq, but also this is a problem still spreading, they point out, in yemen yemen, in libya and pakistan and to a lesser extent in somalia, in north america, and in the philippines. they called it an urgent global security problem today, which has to be addressed on several fronts. >> of course you mentioned the middle of last year kick starting this sort of almost rush as we might see it. that's when islamic state really came into everyone's
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consciousness. >> yes, that's right. in their words, the thousands of foreign firefighters who traveled to syria and iraq live and work in a veritable finishing school for i.s. and al newsra as well. much was the case in afghanistan in the 1990s when osama bin laden was given swairng there. they the expert who is prepared this report say that the most effective way governments can attempt to deal with this is with the prevention of radicalization recruitment, travel of would-be foreign fighters. they use the term those who eat together and bond can together can bond together.mb together. but just last year the heads of state doctored a resolution on this which came up with various and specific ways of trying to
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kush curb this radicalization and travel. all states called on to repress the transporting of individuals traveling to another country. states must prevent the movement of terrorists by best control of their borders and documentation. but lots of people have pointed out, these experts, too that all of this depends very much on the political will of the countries who most need to do so. >> easy enough to talk about it, but to make it happen is another matter. mike, thank you very much. well here in the united kingdom, the leaders of seven political parties are gearing up for their live two-hour general election debate. the contest was announced after weeks of wrangling. it's going to be the one and only time where the main candidates for prime minister will face one another in a debate ahead of polling data. that's may the 7th. the bbc's christian fraser explains why arranging the debate has been quite so difficult. >> well arranging this debate in the end, became a story in itself. it was a convoluted negotiation between all the parties.
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first, it was going to be a leader's debate with four then seven, possibly it was going to be six, and then finally, it did come down to 7. and if you think the invitation list was complicated, then what about the debate itself tonight? spare a thought for our colleague at itv, julie etching hamm etchingham, who must keep order among them. this was her reaction to the rehearsals, a bigger number of podiums than ever before for a uk election. it could get messy and it could get ragged she confessed, but in the end, isn't that exactly a snapshot of the state of our politics? well, quite. let's have a look at how the podium looks tonight. this format will not change. they have drawn lots for this order. and this is also how they will make their opening statements. starting with natalie bennett all the way through to david cameron. and we've been told that they've been asked to send in their height so nobody looks taller than the other. incidentally, whatever your political persuasions, it is good, isn't it to see tonight
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three women finally taking part in these debates. we have natalie bennett of the green, liam wood and nicholas sturgeon of the smp. they are the self-acclaimed alliance of anti-austerity. the three of them will take on what they see as westminster's obsession with cuts. but how are they going to do it and how do you get the camera angles right? which twitches and facial expressions do you take? ultimately, how do you keep it fair for all these parties? well that is a worry for nigel farrage. he made a comment saying had it been a panel of four maybe five, i would have been looking forward to it but i do fear it will generate into a bit of a shouting match. is he happy with his position on the podium right next to ed miliband? well tucked in between clagers and miliband that's all right, but it would have been nicer to be next to david but i don't think he'd like it very much.
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we'll see whether david cameron likes being stood next to nicholas sturgeon of the smp. we'll have to see what comes of it at the end of the night. so that two-hour debate with one break. there'll be a minute opening statement, as i said from each leader, and then that will be followed by a discussion a q&a, on four topics. there'll be a debate on health then on the economy, then on immigration, and then finally, they'll look at the future of the uk. 18 minutes, in all, for each topic. and the questions will come from an audience of 200, that has been carefully selected so it will be representative of the uk, and it will also be politically balanced as well. just to remind you that after the itv debate tonight, there'll be two further ones before the election. this one on the 16th of april. the challenges debate although no conservatives or liberal democrats in that one, and then the final one, just a week before the vote a question special with david dimmableby
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all appearing, although there'll be appearing separately. >> christian fraser, we've teldold you now, haven't we? viewers in the uk can see that debate at 8:00 p.m. tonight. it's going to be carried around the world as well on bbc world news at 1900 gmt. stay with us for that but for us as well. coming up, the muslims in the cuban world. is it time for cuba to allow muslim a more prominent role in its society? a bite size way to enjoy the full size sensation of peppermint and rich dark chocolate. york minis get the sensation.
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you're watching b brks krrksbc world news. i'm david eades. a reminder of our main headline. at least 15 people have been killed and at least 50 more injured in an attack by al shabaab militants on a university campus in kenya. now, the winner of nigeria's
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presidential election, mohammad buhari have said that employment and corruption are the biggest problems facing the country. he beat goodluck jonathan. in an exclusive interview with bbc news the president-elect told my colleague how he was feeling now. >> well i feel fulfilled. this was the fourth attempt i make. 2003 2007 and 2011. and luckily this time around we were successful. >> were you surprised when president goodluck jonathan called you to concede defeat and say congratulations, because that's a very new thing here in nigheria nigeria. >> well, i'm not surprised, because i think he has been
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talking to international community, especially the united states and europe and britain and i think he's respectful of those countries and their leadership and all the something extraordinary that the commander in chief and the president you should allow the law to take its course. let the nigeria election be conducted according to law. that's all they're asking. and i think he gives them he's undertaking, and i think he did his best. >> now, the big work really starts. you've made a lot of promises to nigeria nigeria. have you thought about how you're going to go about fulfilling these promises? >> i think we've identified people with problems. the institute in the country.
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which everybody knows, and the economy by corruption. all nigerians know it. and we are asking nigerians for their cooperation. they shouldn't expect miracles to happen a couple of months after we have taken over. the destruction took many years. 16 years of the ruling parties, the rule of this country. so i believe the country will give us the opportunity to do our best and work as hard as we can. >> i want to just pick up on one point that you made there. you know the insecurity in the country. boko haram. how are you going to tackle that
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beast, if you want? are you going to offer peaceful negotiations, or are you just going to hit them hard. >> well hit them hard with what? boco boko haram, where according to the government out of local government. if for five six years, the nigerian including the ministry collect for local government how can i promise miracle? when i come. but with the cooperation of our neighbors, cameroon chad and nigerian international community, and the commitment we
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are going to get from the ministry, i think it will take us a much shorter time to deal with them. >> just one final question mr. president-elect, you mentioned corruption there and how entrenched it is in nigeria. some people would argue that even within your party, there are many people who are as corrupt as some of these people who you say are going to fight, who are outside your party. are you ready to tackle corruption, to its fullest? >> i made that promise and i hope you and the nigerians would give me the opportunity to see whether my effort will be good enough or not. >> mr. president-elect, thanks for talking to the bbc. >> thank you very much. now to cuba, a country which for many decades found it difficult to create open religious beliefs for people because the country is officially atheist.
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well, now more and more people are practicing catholics, even the country's small muslim community is growing. but it's not easy to follow an islamic lifestyle in a country where alcohol is pretty much everywhere, the national dish is pork, and there are no mosques. >> reporter: it is friday prayers in a coastal town outside of havana. even in this coastal corner of the caribbean, a handful of cuban muslims faithfully observe this most sacred of islamic rituals. but the setting is far from ideal. in an abandoned playground they are open to the elements and to the stares of inquisitive passersby as they pray. even in the capital of that vantha, the muslim community is limited to worshiping in private homes or a single prayer room in a museum to the heritage. but many say that muslim no
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longer belongs in a museum. i'm part of a new generation of muslims in cuba says recent convert, ibrahim al abdiz. we're trying to learn and grow and learn everything we can about the muslim faith. but it's difficult without a mosque. in cuba, there is no point of worship for the disparate pockets of muslims around the country. during his recent state visit to havana president's turkey urged them to build the first mosque on cuban soil. but another muslim nation has already sent in the earth mover. this sign and patch of land is the closest those in the muslim community in cuba have come to having their own place of worship. but even this is a significant
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step. many cuban con visitors feel that with a new sense of openness on the island they may see the mosque finished within the year. one place with muslims can gather and pray is the home of the president of the islamic league of cuba. over cups of sweet tea, he admits it's not easy to lead a strict muslim life in cuba but denies that muslims on the island follow a form of cuban islam. >> translator: there is no cuban islam, nor chinese, czech, or russian. it's the same islam for everyone. based on what allah orders in the koran and what the messenger of god has taught us. >> reporter: until recently even being catholic in cuba was frowned upon. islam has traditionally had even fewer religious, political spaces. but those turkey or saudi arabia melee the foundations, they're confident they may build the fight for islam in cuba
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themselves. will grant bbc news cuba. >> and you may remember cyclone nargas. it devastated myanmar back in 2008, leaving almost 140,000 people dead. well it also felled a huge number of the city's trees. and one resident has been using the felled wood to make guitars. he says he's creating remembrances for those who died during the storm. ♪
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>> just time for me to remind you of the situation in garissa in northeastern province in kenya. we understand that at least 15 people have been killed another 65 wounded as al shabaab launch an attack on the garissa university college campus. that is still going on. thanks for watching bbc world news. i have a wandering eye. i mean, come on. national gives me the control to choose any car in the aisle i want. i could choose you... or i could choose her if i like her more. and i do. oh, the silent treatment. real mature. so you wanna get out of here? go national. go like a pro. you total your brand new car. nobody's hurt,but there will still be pain. it comes when your insurance company says they'll only pay three-quarters of what it takes to replace it. what are you supposed to do, drive three-quarters of a car? now if you had liberty mutual new car replacement,
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this is "gmt" on bbc world news. hello, i'm ron atkins. there's an ongoing hostage situation at a kenyan university. gunmen have killed at least 15 people and are holding others. >> we heard some gunshots and it was sleeping so it was around 5:00 and guys started jumping up and down running for their lives. >> islamic state may have recruited as many as 25,000 foreign fighters. we'll hear where they come from and what tactics are needed to fight them. we'll go to new york where a new exhibition documents the 20th century journey many african-americans made

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